Serendipity is the occurence of an unplanned fortunate discovery. Finding and most of all seeing beauty in the ordinary. How often do we wander past beauty without noticing it? Distracted and too busy with our thoughts and worries, our own little worlds, that we’re unable to appreciate the moment. And really, the moment is all we have, isn’t it? Wabi Sabi is everywhere – the beauty of decay, of things past their best. Nothing is ever complete and perfect. We’re all in a constant flow and isn’t it great! Often on my walk I pass this old mill and I wonder…if these walls could talk, they’d tell amazing stories about all the people that came and went, the birds that flew by, the wars that raged, the oaths of love that were sworn in its shade. I see the walls covered in moss and lichen and I’m deeply touched by the sense of place. And I knew that one day, I’d make a little posy and put it in this window. This day is now. Thanks to dear Cathy who’s inpiring all sorts of vases on a Monday – please do pop over to her blog to see what others have come up with today. Carpe diem 🙂

Serendipität steht für eine zufällige Beobachtung von etwas, das man nicht gesucht hat, das sich jedoch als schöne Überraschung erweist. Schönheit in einfachen Dingen finden oder schlichtweg sehen. Wie oft gehen wir an Schönem vorbei, ohne es wahrzunehmen? Zu zerstreut und beschäftigt mit den eigenen Gedanken und Sorgen, zu absorbiert von unserer kleinen Welt, dass wir den Augenblick nicht geniessen können. Dabei ist der Augenblick alles, was wir haben, oder nicht? Wabi Sabi ist überall – der Zauber des Verfalls, von Dingen jenseits ihres Höhepunkts. Nichts ist je fertig und perfekt. Wir befinden uns in einem konstanten Fluss, ist das nicht wunderbar! Auf meinen Spaziergängen komme ich oft an dieser Mühle vorbei und frage mich, was uns die Mauern wohl erzählen würden: Erstaunliche Geschichten von Menschen, die kamen und gingen, von Vögeln, die vorbeiflogen, Kriegen, Liebesschwüren…Ich sehe die moos- und flechtenbedeckten Mauern und bin tief berührt vom Geist des Ortes. Und ich wusste, dass ich eines Tages ein kleines Sträusschen machen und in das Fenster stellen würde. Dieser Tag ist gekommen. Danke an Cathy, der wir alle möglichen wunderbaren Vasen verdanken – schaut bei ihr vorbei. Carpe diem 🙂

27 thoughts

  1. Serendipity is one of my favourite words. I love your old mill, what a pretty setting for your spring flowers. My house is over 500 years old and one of the things I love about old houses is trying to imagine all the people who have lived here over the centuries. We think we own the house, but we are just a fleeting moment in its history. If only walls could talk. I am enjoying your book very much but I can only read it very slowly as my German is so rusty.

    1. I’m sure your place is just magical, house, garden and all. 500 years, gosh, just think of it! Bet there’s a ghost somewhere 😉 I’m glad you enjoy the book and wish you ‚bon courage‘ while you polish up your German xx

    2. This really resonated with me too, Annette, as you might have expected. It was interesting to read what Chloris said and although our house is not as old as hers when we got the deeds to it gave us sufficient information to trace it in Census data and we learned who used to live in it from the 1841 Census up to the 1911 one- and we already knew from the 50s onwards. It gave us an intriguing insight, particularly into the family names in our village

      1. So your house is still fairly old. Ours in Ireland was 250 years old and full of history. Even D.H. Lawrence spent some time there. I agree there’s something in old places that’s very special and I often miss the place. Alas, life goes on and it’s best not to linger too long.

      2. We can’t be sure of its age, Annette, but it was on an 1802 canals map although part of it is much older, possibly 17th century – and then there’s the bit we built ourselves! We love it of course, and it has a very special atmosphere that vistors are aware of too – we will not be moving from here. Are you from Ireland originally?

      3. It means so much to be in love with the place you’re living in. I’m not Irish but feel honored that you consider the possibility of myself being a native English speaker :D. We lived in Ireland for a long, long time, very much in love with the house and its setting.

      4. I knew you had lived in Ireland and spoken affectionately of it many times – and your English has always been faultless. Was it a difficult choice to leave, or was it an enforced move?

  2. „Der Zauber des Zerfalls“: schön sagst Du das, liebe Annette. Ich bin ihm auch verfallen. Es geht da ja geradezu eine richtige Magie von solch alten Plätzen aus, Geniessen wir sie, solange sie noch sind und nicht von der Moderne und der Renovationswurt weggefressen werden. Ich grüsse Dich lieb.

    1. Liebe Elisabeth, zum Glück liegen viele diese Orte zu abgelegen, um der Zerstörungswut anheim zu fallen. Hoffe, es geht dir gut und wünsche dir einen guten Start in den Frühling

  3. It’s absolutely beautiful, Annette, and I can’t imagine a more picturesque placement. I hope that everyone else who passes it stops a moment to consider this „random act of kindness and senseless beauty.“

  4. How lovely Annette. Yes, we should make more of each moment and be more spontaneous too. I do hope other walkers will see this vase and wonder a little at its origins. It will certainly make them smile! 🙂

    1. I made a little snowdrop wreath last year and put it on the door of a walled abbey garden – it was funny when I found out that a photographer friend of mine spotted it and took a pic afterwards. It’s good to make people smile 🙂

  5. A beautiful little note in the story of such an old place. I’m glad it’s been left to stand, there’s so much craftsmanship and attention to detail in that stonework it’s a powerful reminder of how much those things mattered back in the day.

  6. Zauberhaft, liebe Annette. Ja, die Mauern werden sich auch an dich und das Sträußchen erinnern. Herzliche Grüße aus dem vorfrühlingshaften Deutschland!

Kommentar verfassen

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Google Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden /  Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.